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BIG FLATS, NY- The Michelob Ultra Summer Stage at Tag's would like to welcome
Jon Pardi's Ain't Always the Cowboy Tour with special guests Lainey Wilson and Hailey Whitters!
Friday September 16th, 2022

Ticket Policy:

Tickets On-Sale NOW!
Tickets are available for purchase online at Tagstickets.com, or by phone at 1-800-650-TAGS.

All ticket sales are final.

Please contact the Box Office for all of your ticketing options by emailing info@tagstickets.com or
by phone at 1-800-650-TAGS.

Tickets:*

General Admission starts at $39.75

Reserved Rear Seating starts at $59.75

Reserved Seating starts at $79.75

Gold Circle starts at $99.75

Ticket Prices above are shown at base price.
Industry-standard additional fees may apply

VIP Packages and GA PIT

VIP Headliner Package: $269.00

VIP Opener Package: $199.00

GA Standing PIT Tickets: $119.75

*10% Off Early Bird Pricing in effect on all tickets up until two weeks out from the show. Tickets will revert back to the regular price at Sep 2nd, 2022 at midnight.

Enhance your concert experience:

VIP Parking-$40.00:

Get the best parking spot in the venue without having to leave the house! Purchase in advance your premiere parking space in our VIP Parking Lot located right next to Will Call, Tag's Restaurant, and the Front Gate which means you won't have far to go no matter where you need to be.

Early Entry-$25.00:

Get inside the venue 30 minutes early and beat the crowd to get that up close and personal space to watch the show!

Express Lane-$20.00:

Want to show up on your schedule and avoid the long lines at the gate? Express entry gets you front-of-the-line access!

Jon Pardi

The snarl in his voice sets the tone for Jon Pardi's California Sunrise. He's a traditional country singer, bred in the West Coast honky tonks, and he won't apologize for chasing the dream on his own terms.

It might be considered contemporary cool to inject country songs with programmed drums, rap phrasing, and poppy melodies. But Pardi isn't worried about what's trendy. He's more concerned with making country music that will last, and California Sunrise successfully hits that target. It's stocked with classic Nashville melody, blue-collar lyrical themes, and authentic country instrumentation - real drums, loud-and-proud fiddles, and tangy steel guitar. The album's 12 songs draw a direct link to such forbearers as Dwight Yoakam, George Strait, and Marty Stuart, and it's intentional.

"There's a growing audience for a throwback," Pardi says. "People want to hear somebody who really enjoyed the '90s country music era and brings that to 2016 country. A lot of this record is bringing an old-school flare back to a mainstream sound, but that gives me my own lane."

Pardi established that lane with his 2014 debut, Write You a Song, a rough-and-rowdy project that made him familiar to the suddenly-hip country crowd, thanks to his Top 10 party song "Up All Night." The music oozed with youthful brashness and longneck longing, and Pardi drew a raucous following, increasingly selling out 1,000-2,000 ticket clubs, sometimes out-performing higher-profile country acts playing across town the same night.

In fact, as Pardi began adding material from the new album into the set, he was shocked at the passion with which the music was consumed. As he played unreleased songs from California Sunrise, he discovered fans were already singing back the music verbatim - even the verses - having learned the songs from YouTube postings of earlier concerts. They're ready for Jon Pardi, and he knows exactly what they need.

"I've been hitting the road steady for four years," he says. "I've learned more about what the radio stations want, and I've learned what the fans want. It's a whole different perspective on your second record, and I kind of took that perspective and put it into the 30-year-old me that loves recording music and loves writing."

The result is a creative step forward. It's not a left turn, necessarily, but there's a clearer focus to Pardi's vocal performances and a smart brew of sexy romance, western fashion, and all-American work ethic that permeates California Sunrise. "Head Over Boots," his ultra-melodic two-steppin' radio hit, hints at the attitude with its playful proclamations and Texas dancehall influence. But there's plenty more throughout the project: ragged barroom rhythms in the opening "Out Of Style," Strait-like overtones on the ballad "She Ain't In It," a Motown cowboy romp in "Heartache On The Dance Floor" and a breezy, Eagle-Esque country/rock closure with the title track. As invested as he is in throwback appreciation, Pardi is clearly not a one-dimensional dude.

"It's a very diverse album," he notes. "You can listen to 'She Ain't In It' and you can listen to another song, and they sound like they should be put together in an album, but they're completely different."

The unifying thread, of course, is Pardi's artistry, a blend of that crackling, masculine voice with irresistible musical taste and a working-man spirit that's at the heart of his being. Pardi is a native of the Golden State, but he's no Hollywood Hills golden child. He's a middle-class son of a Northern California construction boss, a kid who - like most kids - tried to figure out the shortcuts, only to learn from the old man the value of putting in the time to finish the job the right way.

"My dad was a super-hard worker," Pardi explains. "Now as a grown man I really appreciate that. The area I'm from is really blue-collar, agricultural, everybody's working, everybody's doing something in construction, something in farming. Everybody's just working hard. When I go back, there's that pride there that's like this made me who I am."

The work started at age 14. He did a short stint at a grocery store before progressing to grunt work at a Ford dealership, to ranch work, and, later, to operating heavy machinery.

"Not everybody knows how to swing a framing hammer," he says. "I've had to teach a friend how to swing a hammer. It's really all about living and learning."
Pardi wasn't afraid to get his hands dirty, but he mostly wanted to wrap them around a guitar. He started writing songs by the age of 12 and was in his first band at 14. By 19, he knew Nashville was in his future. Once he arrived in Music City, there was more conventional work to keep him going - he was a lifeguard at a public pool for a time - but he found his way into Nashville's songwriting community, where he applied some of the same skills he'd learned at his father's dusty feet.

"Surround yourself with great people is a great thing to have in your mind for life," he says. "Find the best people to work with. You can learn a lot."

Among the key people he learned from is songwriter Brice Long, who co-wrote such trad-country pieces as Randy Houser's ballad "Anything Goes" and Gary Allan's #1 single "Nothing On But The Radio."

"Brice is always saying, 'Just keep doing what you're doing, don't worry about everyone else,'" Pardi notes. "You need those kinds of guys that have hit on the radio telling you that."

Pardi became particularly close with songwriter Bart Butler, whose successes include Thomas Rhett's "Make Me Wanna" and Bobby Pinson's "Don't Ask Me How I Know." Butler not only became a frequent co-writer, but he also emerged as Pardi's co-producer, someone who's able to handle the detailed parts of the gig but also to assist Pardi in expressing his own creative voice.

"We've stayed true to Jon's soul, even though we knew that may be a risk," Butler says. "We still feel like country music with twin fiddles or musicians doing a steel solo can compete in the market today."

Indeed, "Head Over Boots" - the first single from California Sunrise - became Pardi's fastest-rising single to date, thanks to its buoyant melody and incessant optimism. Pulling from that same upbeat viewpoint, Sunrise makes multiple allusions to fashion through such titles as "Head Over Boots," the bouncy "Dirt On My Boots" and the suggestive "Cowboy Hat." The latter finds a young buck in a countrified take on the Tom Jones/Joe Cocker title "Leave Your Hat On," keyed by the memorable line "Can't resist you in that Resistol." There's a workman-like ethic embedded in the sweaty "Night Shift" and the pounding "Paycheck." And there's an innate sexiness throughout.

Pardi delivers it all with increasing authority. He introduced that confidence in Write You a Song, but he takes it another step on California, owing to the additional experience he picked up in the interim as an opening act at arenas and amphitheaters for Dierks Bentley and Alan Jackson.

"A vocal cord is like a muscle - if you work it out, it's gonna get better," Pardi suggests. "It's like going to the gym and doing push-ups and sit-ups, and now it's just my voice kind of growing up."

As is his artistry. Pardi wrote a bulk of the songs on California Sunrise, but he was more than willing to consider the material from other Nashville songwriters. He discovered a bevy of tunes that had been overlooked in the rush for synthetic productions from some of his contemporaries. He used mostly the same band that backed him on the first album, and they were invested in both the music and Pardi.

"It was like the Blues Brothers - 'We're getting the band back together!'" Pardi says with a laugh. "We got all seven of them in the room, and there was just a spark."

The whole ensemble was able to hone in on the core of Jon Pardi, that California, working-class kid who still finds inspiration in the unfettered sound of a dancehall guitar. It's snarling, hard country for a new generation, a throwback sound to an energized audience that sees it as moving forward.

Ushered into the world on the same label that launched Buck Owens and Merle Haggard, Pardi has found a whole chain of believers in his mission: the dedicated band behind him, the foot-stomping fans with cold beers at the foot of the stage, and a label that knows Pardi's "throwback" sound is really made for these times.

"Everybody wants to play at an arena and headline it, and I'm not gonna lie - that's one of my goals," Pardi says. "Capitol is always the first to remind me that it's a marathon and not a sprint."

Those people who already know the words to his songs even before they're released are evidence that he's not just running the race. Jon Pardi is winning.

Lainey Wilson

Lainey's zealous appetite for songwriting and performing planted its roots at an age when she had more fingers on one hand than years under her belt. Year after year, song after song, her enthusiasm and fervor for music never let up. As the daughter of a farmer, she was no stranger to hard work and making the most of every discovered opportunity. Throughout high school, Lainey capitalized on her musical talents by offering her services as entertainment for birthday parties with her impressive impersonation of teen idol Hannah Montana...sometimes opening the show with a special appearance by Lainey Wilson herself. Lainey never had to deal with the hassle of packing her life away in boxes when she decided it was time to make the move to Nashville, TN. She simply hitched up her camper trailer and made the 7.5-hour trek from her hometown of Baskin, LA to Music City, where her mobile residence remained anchored in the back of a friend's studio parking lot for the next two years.
Lainey Wilson's career as a songwriter has fostered hundreds of songs, including her most recent single "Tougher", as well as cuts by fellow rising artists, Luke Combs and Kasey Tyndall. Her North Louisiana accent lays the foundation for her retro-classic country tone that's hard to come by on today's modern country scene. Opening for acts such as Joe Nichols, Andy Griggs, Josh Thompson, Dylan Scott, Kevin Sharp, Deana Carter, Tracey Lawrence, William Michael Morgan, and Jamie Lynn Spears, her authentic rural twang is performed with the energy of your favorite Southern Rock band and boldness of female country paradigms like Dolly Parton and Loretta Lynn.

Hailey Whitters

A native of Shueyville, IA, Hailey presently resides in Nashville, TN. She recently signed with Carnival Music Publishing and is currently focused on developing her artistry through song. Carnival Music is home to the talents of David Nail, Troy Jones, Scooter Carusoe, and many others. Carnival is owned and operated by producer Frank Liddell (Miranda Lambert, Kellie Pickler, Lee Ann Womack) and is responsible for generating eleven number ones in the past decade.

Tickets for Ain't Always the Cowboy Tour are on sale now. Tickets are available for purchase online at Tagstickets.com, or by phone at 1-800-650-TAGS.